Tissue Engineering Questions and Answers – Cardiac Tissue Engineering using Stem Cells

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This set of Tissue Engineering MCQs focuses on “Cardiac Tissue Engineering using Stem Cells”.

1. ____________ is caused by the stenosis and/or occlusion of a coronary artery.
a) Stroke
b) Myocardial infarction
c) Osteoporosis
d) Defibrillation
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: A heart attack or MI is brought about by the stenosis and additionally impediment of a coronary conduit prompting ill-advised conveyance of oxygenated blood to locales of the heart. This condition is ordered dependent on the degree of impediment into SST-Elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) when the impediment is totally blocked, or non-ST-Elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) when the impediment isn’t finished.
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2. _______________ are a type of leukocyte, or white blood cell.
a) Monocytes
b) Adherent cells
c) Stem cells
d) Carcinoma cells
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: Monocytes are a sort of leukocyte (white platelet). They are the greatest kind of leukocyte and can isolate into macrophages and myeloid lineage dendritic cells.

3. ___________ is the physiological process through which new blood vessels form from pre-existing vessels.
a) Myogenesis
b) Angiogenesis
c) Thrombopoiesis
d) Endochondral Ossification
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: Angiogenesis is the physiological procedure through which fresh recruits vessels structure from previous vessels, shaped in the prior phase of vasculogenesis. Angiogenesis proceeds with the development of the vasculature by procedures of growing and part.
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4. Eosinophils are a type of disease-fighting white blood cell.
a) TRUE
b) FALSE
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: Eosinophils are a sort of disease-fighting leukocytes. This condition every now and again shows parasitic pollution, a hypersensitive reaction or malignant development. You can have raised measures of eosinophils in your (blood eosinophilia) or in tissues at the site of an infection or disturbance (tissue eosinophilia).

5. _______ is the abnormal enlargement, or thickening, of the heart muscle.
a) Cardiac hypertrophy
b) Ischemia
c) Heart attack
d) Stroke
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: Cardiovascular hypertrophy is the anomalous broadening, or thickening, of the heart muscle, coming about because of increments in cardiomyocyte size and changes in other heart muscle segments, for example, extracellular matrix.
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6. Reperfusion injury is the tissue damage caused when blood supply returns to tissue after a period of ischemia or lack of oxygen.
a) TRUE
b) FALSE
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: Reperfusion injury is the tissue harm caused when blood supply comes back to the tissue after a time of ischemia or absence of oxygen (anoxia or hypoxia). Reperfusion of ischemic tissues is frequently connected with microvascular damage, especially because of expanded penetrability of vessels and arterioles that lead to an expansion of dispersion and liquid filtration over the tissues.

Sanfoundry Global Education & Learning Series – Tissue Engineering.

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Manish Bhojasia - Founder & CTO at Sanfoundry
Manish Bhojasia, a technology veteran with 20+ years @ Cisco & Wipro, is Founder and CTO at Sanfoundry. He is Linux Kernel Developer & SAN Architect and is passionate about competency developments in these areas. He lives in Bangalore and delivers focused training sessions to IT professionals in Linux Kernel, Linux Debugging, Linux Device Drivers, Linux Networking, Linux Storage, Advanced C Programming, SAN Storage Technologies, SCSI Internals & Storage Protocols such as iSCSI & Fiber Channel. Stay connected with him @ LinkedIn | Youtube | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter