Professional Communication Questions & Answers – Clauses and Connectors

«
»

This set of Professional Communication Multiple Choice Questions & Answers (MCQs) focuses on “Clauses and Connectors”.

1. Which of these is an example of adversative co-ordinating conjunction?
a) He didn’t raise his hand and he didn’t raise his voice.
b) She was pretty, but she was dumb.
c) Hurry up, else you will lose.
d) You must have not studied hard, for the paper was easy.
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: The correct statement is: She was pretty, but she was dumb. The adversative co-ordinating conjunction represents contrast.
advertisement

2. Which of these is not an example of subordinating conjunction related to cause?
a) Because
b) Since
c) As
d) Unless
View Answer

Answer: d
Explanation: Cause is indicated by words like because, since and as. For example: He didn’t win the race, because he was injured.

3. A sentence may be joined by two clauses.
a) True
b) False
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: The statement is true. The clauses may be joined by such connectors as and, but, that, when etc. For example, The water is cold and tasty.
advertisement
advertisement

4. Which of these words is not used to join the dependent clause with the main clause?
a) Who
b) When
c) For
d) But
View Answer

Answer: d
Explanation: The dependent clause can be joined with the main clause by using words like who, when and for. But is used to join independent clauses.

5. Which of these words are not used by independent clauses?
a) Nor
b) Still
c) And
d) For
View Answer

Answer: d
Explanation: Independent clauses use the words and, but, or, nor, still and however. For example, “He wanted to go in the car, but it was unserviceable. For is used by dependent clauses.
advertisement

6. A dependent clause may refer to a noun or pronoun in the main clause.
a) True
b) False
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: The statement is true. A dependent clause may refer to a noun or pronoun in the main clause. It is joined with the main clause by connectors like what, which, whose, etc.

7. In relative clauses, which of these is used to refer to things?
a) Who
b) Which
c) That
d) Whom
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: In relative clauses, we use which to refer to things, not to people. For example: The student who sits next to me in class comes from China. In this sentence, which isn’t used because people are being referred to. A sentence that uses which to refer to things is: The ice cream flavor which I like, was out of stock at the store.
advertisement

8. Choose the correct statement :
a) Although he was hurt, but he continued to walk.
b) Although he was hurt, he continued to walk.
c) He was hurt, he continued to walk.
d) Although he continued to walk, he was hurt.
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: The correct statement is: Although he was hurt, he continued to walk. We don’t use although and but together. To link two clauses, we just use one conjunction.

9. Choose the correct statement:
a) There were between 8 to 10 policemen present.
b) There were between 8 and 10 policemen present.
c) There were among 8 to 10 policemen present.
d) There were atleast 8 and 10 policemen present.
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: The correct statement is: There were between 8 and 10 policemen present. After between we use and and not to.
advertisement

10. Fill in the blank:
The man was badly injured, _____ he was alive.
a) however
b) but
c) though
d) hence
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: The correct statement is: The man was badly injured, but he was alive. However is an adverb. It can not link sentences. We should use conjunctions like but, although or yet to link two contrasting clauses.

Sanfoundry Global Education & Learning Series – Professional Communication.

To practice all areas of Professional Communication, here is complete set of 1000+ Multiple Choice Questions and Answers.

Participate in the Sanfoundry Certification contest to get free Certificate of Merit. Join our social networks below and stay updated with latest contests, videos, internships and jobs!

advertisement
advertisement
Manish Bhojasia - Founder & CTO at Sanfoundry
Manish Bhojasia, a technology veteran with 20+ years @ Cisco & Wipro, is Founder and CTO at Sanfoundry. He is Linux Kernel Developer & SAN Architect and is passionate about competency developments in these areas. He lives in Bangalore and delivers focused training sessions to IT professionals in Linux Kernel, Linux Debugging, Linux Device Drivers, Linux Networking, Linux Storage, Advanced C Programming, SAN Storage Technologies, SCSI Internals & Storage Protocols such as iSCSI & Fiber Channel. Stay connected with him @ LinkedIn | Youtube | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter