Biomedical Instrumentation Questions and Answers – Other Biomedical Recorders

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This set of Biomedical Instrumentation test focuses on “Other Biomedical Recorders”.

1. How much blood is present in an average adult?
a) 10-12 L
b) 2-3 L
c) 5-6 L
d) 20-25 L
View Answer

Answer: c
Explanation: In an average adult about 5-6 L of blood is present. Blood consists of corpuscles suspended in a fluid called plasma in the proportion of 45 parts of corpuscles (cells) to 55 parts of plasma. The percentage of cells in the blood is called the haematocrit value or packed cell volume (PCV).
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2. What is the blood percentage of total body weight?
a) 5-10 %
b) 20-30 %
c) 2-3 %
d) 10-15 %
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: The blood constitutes 5–10% of the total body weight and in the average adult, it amounts to 5–6 l. Blood consists of corpuscles suspended in a fluid called plasma in the proportion of 45 parts of corpuscles (cells) to 55 parts of plasma. The percentage of cells in the blood is called the haematocrit value or packed cell volume (PCV).

3. Blood consists of corpuscles suspended in a fluid called plasma in the proportion of 45 parts of ____________ to 55 parts of _____________
a) Plasma, corpuscles
b) Corpuscles, plasma
c) Protoplasma, cytozomes
d) Cytozomes, protoplasma
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: Blood consists of corpuscles suspended in a fluid called plasma in the proportion of 45 parts of corpuscles (cells) to 55 parts of plasma. The percentage of cells in the blood is called the haematocrit value or packed cell volume (PCV). The majority of the corpuscles in the blood are red blood cells (erythrocytes), others being white blood cells (leucocytes) and platelets (thrombocytes).
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4. The percentage of cells in the blood is called _____________
a) haematocrit value
b) packet corpuscles value
c) packed haematocrit value
d) corpuscles value
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: The percentage of cells in the blood is called the haematocrit value or packed cell volume (PCV). The majority of the corpuscles in the blood are red blood cells (erythrocytes), others being white blood cells (leucocytes) and platelets (thrombocytes).

5. Which of the following blood constituent is in the form of a bi-concave disc?
a) lymphocytes
b) leucocutes
c) neutrophils
d) erythrocytes
View Answer

Answer: d
Explanation: Red blood cells have the form of a bi-concave disc with a mean diameter of about 7.5 m and thickness of about 1.7 m. The mean surface area of the cell is about 134mm2. There are about 5.5 million of them in every cubic millimetre of blood in men and nearly 5 million in women.
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6. Diameter of erythrocytes is in the range of ___________
a) nano meters
b) micro meters
c) pico meters
d) femto meters
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: Mean diameter of about 7.5 m and a thickness of about 1.7 m. The mean surface area of the cell is about 134mm2. There are about 5.5 million of them in every cubic millimetre of blood in men and nearly 5 million in women.

7. In the whole body, there are about 25 billion erythrocytes and they are constantly being destroyed and replaced at a rate of about 9000 million per hour.
a) True
b) False
View Answer

Answer: a
Explanation: It is true. In the whole body, there are about 25 billion erythrocytes and they are constantly being destroyed and replaced at a rate of about 9000 million per hour. There are about 5.5 million of them in every cubic millimetre of blood in men and nearly 5 million in women.
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8. The normal red cell lasts approximately how many days before it is destroyed?
a) 240
b) 10
c) 12
d) 120
View Answer

Answer: d
Explanation: The normal red cell lasts approximately 120 days before it is destroyed. There are about 5.5 million of them in every cubic millimetre of blood in men and nearly 5 million in women. In the whole body, there are about 25 billion erythrocytes and they are constantly being destroyed and replaced at a rate of about 9000 million per hour.

9. The erythrocytes have a nucleus.
a) True
b) False
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: The erythrocytes have no nucleus. They are responsible for carrying oxygen from the lungs to the tissues and carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs. In the whole body, there are about 25 billion erythrocytes and they are constantly being destroyed and replaced at a rate of about 9000 million per hour.
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10. Anaemia is reduction/increase _________
a) in the carbon dioxide carrying capacity of blood
b) in the oxygen carrying capacity of blood
c) in the oxygen carrying capacity of blood
d) in the carbon dioxide carrying capacity of blood
View Answer

Answer: b
Explanation: Anaemia is a reduction in the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. It can develop from a change in the number, volume or Hb concentration of erythrocytes, caused by bone marrow dysfunction resulting in the poor production rate of RBCs. Since these changes are specific, the measurement of packed cell volume (PCV), the number of RBCs and the haemoglobin (Hb) are very important.

Sanfoundry Global Education & Learning Series – Biomedical Instrumentation.

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Manish Bhojasia - Founder & CTO at Sanfoundry
Manish Bhojasia, a technology veteran with 20+ years @ Cisco & Wipro, is Founder and CTO at Sanfoundry. He is Linux Kernel Developer & SAN Architect and is passionate about competency developments in these areas. He lives in Bangalore and delivers focused training sessions to IT professionals in Linux Kernel, Linux Debugging, Linux Device Drivers, Linux Networking, Linux Storage, Advanced C Programming, SAN Storage Technologies, SCSI Internals & Storage Protocols such as iSCSI & Fiber Channel. Stay connected with him @ LinkedIn | Youtube | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter